Category Archives: Money

Meeting Budget; What’s Working In Churches?

Here is a part of church ministry that I don’t like dealing with but I think about often: The church budget.

A pastor-mentor of mine once gave a helpful word of advice to me when I first became a pastor. He said, “You do have to think about attendance and budget numbers, but don’t think about it too much.”

I wish that I never thought about it at all. I hope and trust there will be no money in heaven since the love of it is the root of all sorts of evil (1 Timothy 6:10).

But I do need to think about money because it does matter and it matters to God; for where your treasure is there your heart will be also (Matt. 6:21). Almost every person in the world uses money, and what we do with our money matters because it reveals something about where we find out joy and where we put our trust.

Church budgets matter because they reveal something about the hearts of people who come to our churches. We should not focus merely on the bottom line of the church budget. Meeting budget cannot be the chief motivation, but when a budget is not met because only 27% of people get close to a tithe, it almost certainly says something about the devotion of those who claim to follow Jesus. So meeting the budget should not be a primary goal, rather the goal should be helping people trust God with their money and one of the ways people trust God with their money is by giving a sacrificial portion the body of Christ for ministry to the church family and the world.

I say all of this to qualify what I am about to report. In all things, the motivation must be the glory of God in Christ, by teaching people to joyfully submit to the word of God. Money is for Jesus, not just to meet a budget. Though we do hope to meet budget. This though is a bi-product of submitted lives.

I recently was watching a webinar on www.givingrocket.com  that talked about what churches do to successfully meet budget.

There was a survey of 1,078 churches. These churches included small churches, larges churches, rural churches, urban churches, etc. What they found was that 14% of churches exceed budget, 39% meet budget and 47% are under budget.

They then focused on the habits of the 14% that made them successful at meeting budget. Here’s the top-five strategies of churches that met budget.

  1. They accept automatic reoccurring donations. 67% of churches surveyed did this.
  2. They offered online giving. 63% of churches survey did this.
  3. They offered personal finance ministry.
  4. They used a giving kiosk that enabled them to give and set up reoccurring donations. Only 11% of churches did this.
  5. They communicated with donors at least quarterly by letter and giving contribution statement.

Interestingly enough, out of the 12 strategies, preaching on money was said to be the least important. That’s hard to believe because people can’t do what they don’t know, but it is interesting. (You can retrieve this report with more information by clicking on the link above.)

Again, this scares me because as a pastor I don’t want to meet budget if people are not being changed by God. But I do think this again exposes that churches have not been good at keeping up with the changing times. You will notice that three out of the five recommendations have a clear electronic component. Take number four for instance, how many people actually carry a checkbook or cash with them anymore? Some people simply don’t give because of lack of discipline/intention.

What is a healthy balance between churches helping people love God with their money and being up to speed with a changing world to help people give? I’m still sifting through that myself, but I don’t want to just meet church budget, I want people to trust God with their money.

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the Danger of Happy Pictures and the Forever Lazy

Click on the following link to view a harmless picture and then come back for an explanation.

So here’s what you should have seen. Large letters telling you that you can log-in with a user ID and password to access online banking. And then there is a lot of other stuff that I have yet to have a reason to care about.

But right next to the log-in and password is a picture that I have seen hundreds of times and it bothers me. Why does a happy woman at a computer bother me?

As I said, I have been to this website hundreds of times to check and manage our checking account, and not once can I recall being that happy, or being made happy by checking my money.

Hang with me.

I appreciate the ease of access. I appreciate the convenience of being able to know what I have or if someone is stealing my money. I appreciate that Banc First provides helpful customer service for banking.

And while it may give me peace of mind and make my life somewhat easier, it doesn’t make me that happy. I don’t ponder with happy anticipation all day long the thought of getting online to see how much money I have because Banc First provides this helpful service. Banc First’s online banking doesn’t make me happy.

I’m not bothered that I am not happy when I go to Banc First online checking, I am bothered by what the picture is communicating.

Here it is: If you have Banc First online banking you will be happy.

Hasn’t worked for me.

Yet almost all advertising works this way and we buy it hook, line and sinker. For instance, a Forever Lazy will make you happy. Go to the link and observe that everyone is happy. There’s nothing wrong with having a Forever Lazy???? But it wont’ make you happy – at least for long.

Are you trying to buy the joy and peace that the world is selling? The true problem is that we buy someones idea of what will make everything better and it always let’s us down.

The Bible is clear that we were made for God and our souls are restless until we find rest in Him (Augustine).

“Be appalled, O heavens, at this, And shudder, be very desolate,” declares the LORD. “For my people have committed two evils: They have forsaken Me, the fountain of living waters, To hew out cisterns, Broken cisterns That can hold no water.” Jeremiah 2:12-13.

So use Banc First and their online banking. Buy a Forever Lazy if it suits your fancy – or maybe not. But don’t think for one minute they will give you something that lasts. They are broken cisterns that can hold no water. Trust in the Creator and not the created and then you can rightly appreciate online banking.

John Wesley’s Generosity For the Sake of the Kingdom

The following is an incredible summary of a lifetime of generosity. Not everyone has the ability to do what John Wesley did, but all of us can have his Kingdom aspirations (Read the last quote of Wesley). You should read this and be encouraged and challenged. Perhaps Wesley’s example is much like that of Barnabas who the apostles called “Son of Encouragement” (Acts 4:36) for his sacrificial generosity.

I was recently doing some reading and came across a sermon by John Piper from 1995 titled: “Toward the Tithe and Beyond; How God Funds His Work.” In this sermon Piper gives the example of John Wesley and his generosity. This is an amazing challenge for all of us as we seek to honor Christ with our money – after all it is His money anyway (Ps. 24:1). Piper writes:

John Wesley was one of the great evangelists of the 18th Century, born in 1703. In 1731 he began to limit his expenses so that he would have more money to give to the poor. In the first year his income was 30 pounds and he found he could live on 28 and so gave away two. In the second year his income doubled but he held his expenses even, and so he had 32 pounds to give away (a comfortable year’s income). In the third year his income jumped to 90 pounds and he gave away 62 pounds. In his long life Wesley’s income advanced to as high as 1,400 pounds in a year. But he rarely let his expenses rise above 30 pounds. He said that he seldom had more than 100 pounds in his possession at a time.

This so baffled the English Tax Commissioners that they investigated him in 1776 insisting that for a man of his income he must have silver dishes that he was not paying excise tax on. He wrote them, “I have two silver spoons at London and two at Bristol. This is all the plate I have at present, and I shall not buy any more while so many round me want bread.”

When he died in 1791 at the age of 87, the only money mentioned in his will was the coins to be found in his pockets and dresser. Most of the 30,000 pounds he had earned in his life had been given away. He wrote,

“I cannot help leaving my books behind me whenever God calls me hence; but in every other respect, my own hands will be my executors.

In other words, I will put a control on my spending myself, and I will go beyond the tithe for the sake of Christ and his kingdom.” (Quotes from Mission Frontiers, Sept./Oct. 1994, nos. 9–10, pp. 23–24.)

Counting Generosity – Sobering Statistics

These statistics are from Mark Driscoll’s: Doctrine; What Christians Should Believe pgs 396-97. They are fairly shocking when you consider passages like Luke 12:33; John 3:16; Acts 4:32-37; Romans 5:8; 2 Cor. 8:9.

  • More than one in four American Protestants give away $0.
  • From 1968 to 2005, giving to Protestant churches declined from 3.1 percent of income to 2.6 percent of income.
  • The average regular churchgoer, compared to those who say they are Christians but rarely attend church, gives 6 percent of their after-tax income.
  • The median annual giving for a Christian is $200-just over half a percent of after-tax income.
  • Mormons give more than 7 times the amount of money as a percentage of income than do Catholics.
  • About 27 percent of evangelicals give away 10 percent or more of their income.
  • About 5 percent of Christians provide 60 percent of the money to churches and religious groups.
  • 20 percent of all Christians account for 86 percent of all giving.
  • Among protestants, 10 percent of evangelicals, 28 percent of mainline folk, 33 percent of fundamentalists, and 40 percent of liberal Protestants give nothing.

If our treasure reveals the priority of our hearts (Matt. 6:11), then what do these statistics reveal about the hearts about many professing Christians?

How To Pay Off Your Mortgage Early

I was told several years ago that if you made an extra principal payment every year over the life of a 30 year loan then you could pay your house off seven years early.

Most of us buy as much house as we can and spend what we make so it is hard to imagine making a thirteenth principal payment.

So let’s say you can’t afford another principal payment a year. Here’s something smaller you might be able to do.

If you had a 30 year fixed-rate mortgage at 6 percent with a $200,000 balance, and you paid an extra $75 four times a year, you could cut one year off of your 30 year mortgage. Or you could think of it like this; pay an extra $25 per month for a year.

Most people pay what they have to  and not what they could. My parents told me a long time ago that even if you pay a little extra each month, it will end up saving you a lot in the long-run.

Lacey and I have a goal of paying down all debt as fast as possible so we can be free to give and go when God call us to do so. I don’t want to be bogged down by debt and the solution is to be disciplined enough to do a little more now so I can save money and have less to pay later.

It just takes a little knowledge and a lot of discipline. I hope this helps someone.

Eagle Heights Missions Month; What If Everyone Gave A Little?

Over the past year Eagle Heights gave almost $26,000 specifically for missions. This giving was above and beyond general budget giving and we used the money to support our own mission trips and individuals who went on other mission trips.

I am thankful for people who are generous with their money to support the mission of Jesus all over the world. And I want us (Eagle Heights) to ramp up the generosity and give more and more.

As a matter of fact, I don’t think it would be too difficult to do a lot more.

What if every member committed to give $10 a month to missions? Because let’s face it, some give way more than that and many people don’t give anything. But what if……………..$10 per person? Let’s suppose 300 people gave the $10 that it would cost to buy two venti lattes. $10 x 300 = $3,000.00 x 12 months = $36,000.00.

When everyone gives a little it equals a lot. And who can’t give $10 a month. Maybe a few people, but most of us with smallest sacrifice could join with others to do so much more than we currently are doing.

Even high school and university students can afford $10 a month.

The truth is a sad one – It’s not that most people can’t give, it’s just that they won’t.

And I will remind every person without shame that our basis for giving is Jesus Himself, and He gave everything He had to do the will of the Father (2 Cor. 8:9).

With Jesus as our motivation and example, I hope we will joyfully seek to give and do more. Here are a few questions that might be asked when it comes to missions month giving:

FAQs about Missions Giving

  • Why not just give all my money to missions? When you give to the local church you are giving to missions. But keep in mind that Eagle Heights is on mission right here in Stillwater (Acts 1:8). Local churches use money for ministries just like missionaries use money. Eagle Heights uses its budget to employ staff, provide ministries and give to ministries and since the local church is God’s plan to advance the mission of Jesus, our first giving emphasis should be to the local church we are committed to by membership. A strong local church should be a strong missions giving and sending church.
  • Why do we emphasize missions and missions giving? Because God prioritizes missions (Genesis 12:1-3; Ps. 67; Matt. 24:14, 28:19; Acts 1:8) and money is an indicator that our priorities are God’s priorities. Missions month helps us to shine the light on what God wants to do for all peoples so we do not become selfish with the gospel we enjoy.
  • How much should I give to missions? After you have trusted God by supporting your local church with regular giving (tithe), ask God what He wants you to do above and beyond what you normally give. God is faithful to reveal himself to those who seek Him.
  • I can’t give much, does the little I give really matter? Yes it matters. First, it matters because you have trusted God with the little you have (Luke??). Obedience is success. The amount is not the point, but rather the motive and heart. Second, if you gave nothing last year and decided to give $8 a month this year (2 lattes at Starbucks or Aspen), you would end up giving $96 this next year. Suppose God moved ten other people to do the same. That would be $960 more than last year. God multiplies obedience and we do far more together than by ourselves.
  • How will this money be used? All of the money given to missions will be used for local and world missions and ministries. None of the missions money is used for the Eagle Heights general budget.
  • When do I give? How do I give? We are going to take up our missions giving commitment on the Sunday, November 20th. Give by marking on your giving envelope the amount you want to give to missions.

Giving 98% and Keeping 2

Suppose someone decided to become a member of a biblical local church. Suppose that someone was convinced that giving regularly was a good and right thing. Suppose that someone asked: “What do I have to give to God and this church?”

As a pastor, if someone did ask this question I would probably ask them to repeat themselves. I’ve done over one-hundred membership interviews now at Eagle Heights and no one has yet to ask that question. As a matter of fact, no one has said to me: “Pastor, when I become a member of Eagle Heights you can count on me to tithe/give.”

But there is something wrong with the question. Namely, the words “have to.” It smacks of legalism.

What would be really exciting and gospel-centered is if someone said: “Pastor, I want you to know that God has blessed me abundantly and I have the desire to give as much as I can away that God might use my blessing to bless others through the work of God’s church.”

And I hope that one day it happens, and I hope it happens a lot. Especially in light of 2 Cor. 8:9. “For you know the grace of our Lord Jesus Christ, that though He was rich, yet for your sake He became poor, so that you through His poverty might become rich.” Contextually, this is a passage about joyful and generous giving and Jesus’ example should be our motivation for giving our money.The gospel is the reason we give. How could we not?

Barnabas sold a tract of land and laid it at the feet of the apostles (Acts 4:36). The Acts church epitomized radical and sacrificial giving (Acts 4:32-37). We have biblical examples of giving above and beyond what is expected.

I was recently doing some reading and came across a sermon by John Piper from 1995 titled: “Toward the Tithe and Beyond; How God Funds His Work.” In this sermon Piper gives the example of John Wesley and his generosity. This is an amazing challenge for all of us as we seek to honor Christ with our money – after all it is His money anyway (Ps. 24:1). Piper writes:

John Wesley was one of the great evangelists of the 18th Century, born in 1703. In 1731 he began to limit his expenses so that he would have more money to give to the poor. In the first year his income was 30 pounds and he found he could live on 28 and so gave away two. In the second year his income doubled but he held his expenses even, and so he had 32 pounds to give away (a comfortable year’s income). In the third year his income jumped to 90 pounds and he gave away 62 pounds. In his long life Wesley’s income advanced to as high as 1,400 pounds in a year. But he rarely let his expenses rise above 30 pounds. He said that he seldom had more than 100 pounds in his possession at a time.

This so baffled the English Tax Commissioners that they investigated him in 1776 insisting that for a man of his income he must have silver dishes that he was not paying excise tax on. He wrote them, “I have two silver spoons at London and two at Bristol. This is all the plate I have at present, and I shall not buy any more while so many round me want bread.”

When he died in 1791 at the age of 87, the only money mentioned in his will was the coins to be found in his pockets and dresser. Most of the 30,000 pounds he had earned in his life had been given away. He wrote,

“I cannot help leaving my books behind me whenever God calls me hence; but in every other respect, my own hands will be my executors.

In other words, I will put a control on my spending myself, and I will go beyond the tithe for the sake of Christ and his kingdom.” (Quotes from Mission Frontiers, Sept./Oct. 1994, nos. 9–10, pp. 23–24.)

The U.S. Economy and the Christ-Follower

I have been reading a book and books can be dangerous things – they can change your life. In addition to the Bible I have been reading Revolution In World Missions (You can get a free copy by clicking on the link.) by KP Yohannan.

Yohannan is the founder of The Gospel for Asia and in the book he talks about his journey to start and maintain an indigenous missionary effort to reach Asia with the gospel of Jesus Christ.

You should read the book. But be warned, it will make you uncomfortable. Especially if you are an American and especially if you are a Christian American.

The book made me wonder about the mindset of most Christians with regard to the  current U.S. economy. Cable news incessantly reports that we are quickly heading to the point of no return in regards to our debt. The U.S. Debt Clock – 14 trillion plus and counting. A political war is waging right now in Washington D.C. about raising the debt ceiling so that the U.S. doesn’t default on its debt and there is talk about slashing spending and raising taxes to solve the problem. In recent years the value of  the U.S. dollar has receded like an ocean before a tsunami.

Consequently we fret about the future of medicare, social security, the future for our children, retirement and the all important American Dream.

But who is concerned about the economy for Gospel reasons? Who has stopped to think that if the “debt crisis” isn’t solved then Americans won’t be able to support missions any longer? If we do have a cataclysmic economic meltdown as the world’s sole superpower, will giving to the mission of Jesus dry up? Will the advance of the gospel be stopped?

I’m not suggesting it will, I’m just asking who is concerned enough about gospel-less people to ask?

What we don’t think about may be just as troubling as what we do think about. But perhaps not thinking is the very thing that keeps us safe from actually doing what Christ would really want us to do. Thinking can also be dangerous thing and not thinking can be forever deadly.

The economy can be a means to a gospel, God-glorifying end. I hope that’s how every Christian would think about it first and foremost.

Consider the observations of Yahannan with regard to Americans and money.

Yahannan, who is from India, came to the United States in the early 1970s to attend Bible School at Criswell Bible Institute in Dallas, Texas and was stunned at the wealth Americans possessed compared to the rest of the world. He writes in his book about the west and missions: “The needed money is in the highly developed nations of the West. North American Christians alone, without much sacrifice, can meet all the needs of the churches in the Two-Thirds World.”

Yahannan writes about the wealth of Americans:

  • “It bothered me that one nation should have such spiritual luxury while 40,000 people were dying in my homeland every day without hearing the Gospel even once.”
  • “85 percent of all Bibles printed today are in English for the nine percent of the world who read English.
  • “88 percent of the world’s people have never owned a Bible while Americans have an average of four in every household.”
  • “The United States, with its 600,000 congregations or groups, is blessed with 1.5 million full-time Christian workers, or on full-time religious leader for every 182 people in the nation. In the rest of the world of 2 billion unreached people, there is one missionary working for every 78,000 people…..”

These are convicting to say the least, but there’s no need to hate the United States or money. There’s no need to hate your things or hate yourself for having things. There is however, a need to think biblically and eternally about money and the economy.

Don’t miss this. God can use your money if you allow Him to use you. On the other hand, I don’t know if God can use ignorance and selfishness.

Jesus and Money; Who do You Trust and Worship

Should a member of a local church be expected to give to their local church? Should they tithe? Is it disobedience to God if they don’t? What does biblical giving and sharing and stewardship look like? Are there legitimate circumstances for not giving regularly? What does the Bible teach about the church and money?

These are all questions that I am currently pondering and hope to drill down on and see if I can achieve some clarity. The biblical authors speak about money often so there certainly has to be some answers we can latch on to and live by.

Money is Necessary

Money is simply necessary in this life – at least if you want to live for long. Food costs money and so does medical care and clothes and a plethora of other items that are needs. The church needs money too. I am leading a church that employs staff, including myself, and we meet in a building that has utilities and needs to be cleaned. We have ministries that use resources. We park at the building on asphalt that requires maintenance. We have people who need financial assistance. We believe that God has called us to send people all over the world on the mission of gospel witness. We support other ministries and cooperate with other churches to share the gospel. All of these things require money. In this life money is almost always necessary, whether we like it or not. I suppose I could simply say that the church family needs to give because if we don’t then there are many things we simply could not do. But I don’t want to be godlessly practical, though I might make an almost unassailable pragmatic argument when it comes to money and the church. Money, however, is ultimately about God and others (Matthew 22:36-40) and unless we start with God then we will inevitably run into some godless ditch.

“My” Money Belongs to God

I belong to God, therefore my money belongs to God. If I don’t even belong to myself then how can the stuff I posses belong to me. I am simply a steward of God’s stuff and all that I have been given by God is to be used for God’s purposes. You belong to God too. Even if you are reading this and you haven’t trusted in God through Christ by the regeneration of the Holy Spirit, you belong to God. Why? He created you. He owns you like a child belongs to a parent. If you have trusted in Christ then he doubly owns you because you have been bought from slavery in sin to be a Son and steward of God. What you do with your money is first and foremost about obedience to God. Money is not just a pragmatic issue, it is a devotion and worship issue.

Jesus Will Demand Your Money and Your Response Will Reveal Your Devotion

A very wealthy young man came to Jesus because he rightly recognized that Jesus could give him eternal life. The young man asked Jesus how he might obtain what he was after (Obtain is an interesting word – sounds like what happens when you buy something). Jesus told him to obey all the commandments. The young man responded that he had done what was necessary but wondered what else he could do. (If that were the case it makes you wonder why he asked Jesus in the first place.) Jesus tells him that to be perfect he must sell everything and give it to the poor and follow Jesus. Another sidebar: Jesus doesn’t say sell it and give it to me, he says sell it and give it to others. Matthew records that the young man went away grieving. Why? He had a bunch of stuff and he didn’t want Jesus or the poor to have it (Matthew 19:16-22).

Oh the applications we could make from this story. But let’s be clear about what this story is about. It’s about our allegiance and about who we worship. Jesus is Lord and He doesn’t even flinch when he asks you and I to be willing to give it all. And why is that? Because to have Jesus is to have everything that matters for eternity (Matthew 19:28-30). By the way, Jesus gave it all for you and to ask you to give it all is nothing less than He himself gave. Jesus is no hypocrite, He is humble and authentic to the core.

Jesus demands your allegiance because He is Lord and because He can. Your money and stuff say more about your loyalties than perhaps anything else you have, or do. It also says everything about who you trust. This rich young guy simply did not trust Jesus and because he did not trust Him he wasn’t about to replace his allegiance to his stuff with the Man who could give him riches forever. Bottom line: The rich young ruler trusted and worshiped his stuff (maybe himself since he could own his stuff) more than Jesus, and his stuff was his lord. Jesus didn’t hesitate to let the rich young ruler walk because if Jesus doesn’t have a person’s stuff then He doesn’t have the person. Our money and possessions are a reliable indicator about who has our devotion and worship.

I suppose the proper question is this: Does Jesus have you or does your stuff and money have you? You cannot serve God and wealth (Matthew 6:24).

Because money is necessary, it touches every part of our lives.

But this is not my life.

My life belongs to Jesus and so does my stuff.

Jesus has every right to ask me to give up everything, including my money.

Whether or not I am willing to give it all away for Him strikingly reveals who I trust and who I worship.


Hetty Green the Miser; What She Can Teach Us About God and Wealth

Jesus said and would still say to us today:

Do not store up for yourselves treasures on earth , where moth and rust destroy, and where thieves break in and steal. But store up for yourselves treasures in heaven……You cannot serve God and money (wealth/stuff). Matthew 6:19-20a, 24b (Becoming a Christian)

I want you to meet Hetty Green (1834-1916). If you type “famous misers” into yahoo’s search engine it will pull up an article in Wikipedia that has eight famous misers. (Not necessarily a thing to be proud of as you will see.) “A miser or cheapskate, is a person who is reluctant to spend money, sometimes to the point of forgoing even basic comforts and some necessities.” (From Wikipedia) Read this and notice the zeal for which Hetty served wealth.

  • Her family owned a large whaling fleet and she was  reading financial papers to her dad by the age of six. When she was 13, Hetty became the family bookkeeper.
  • When her father died in 1864 she inherited $7.5 million.
  • At the age of 33 she married Edward Henry Green, member of a wealthy Vermont family. She made him renounce all rights to her money before the wedding on July 11, 1867.
  • She never turned on the heat nor used hot water.
  • She wore one old black dress and undergarments that she changed only after they had been worn out. She did not wash her hands and rode an old carriage. She ate mostly pies that cost fifteen cents.
  • Keenly detail-oriented, she would travel thousands of miles – alone, in an era when few women would dare travel unescorted – to collect a debt of a few hundred dollars.
  • Her frugality extended to family life. Her son Ned broke his leg as a child, and Hetty tried to have him admitted in a hospital charity ward. When she was recognized, she stormed away vowing to treat the wounds herself. The leg contracted gangrene and had to be amputated
  • Her daughter Sylvia lived with Hetty until her thirties. Hetty disapproved of all of Sylvia’s suitors because she suspected they wanted only to get their hands on her money. When Green finally let Matthew Astor Wilkes marry Sylvia on February 23, 1909, after a two-year courtship, the groom waived his right to inherit Sylvia’s fortune, and received US$5,000 for signing this prenuptial agreement. (Wilks, a minor heir to the Astor fortune, entered the marriage with US$2,000,000 of his own; enough to assure Hetty that he wasn’t simply gold-digging.)
  • When her children left home, Green moved repeatedly among small apartments in Brooklyn Heights and mainly Hoboken, New Jersey to avoid establishing a residence permanent enough to attract the attention of tax officials in any state.
  • In her old age she began to suffer from a bad hernia but refused to have an operation because it cost $150.
  • Estimates of her net worth ranged from $100 million to $200 million (or $1.9 – $3.8 billion in 2006 dollars), arguably making her the richest woman in the world at the time. She was buried in Bellow Falls, Vermont next to her late husband, having converted late in life to his Episcopalian faith so they could be interred together.
  • Her children tended to spend their money more freely. (A real shocker.)

Jesus said at the end of verse 24, “You cannot serve God and wealth.” Hetty served wealth and appears to have loved it, but what would it look like if we followed her example and served God (not money) with the same zeal and discipline? We might be a pharisee, that is true enough, and we certainly would not want to emulate the neglect of others to serve God. To do that would be a clear contradiction of the life of Christ and all that He taught. However, Hetty might also be a model for a life devoted to God in all things. What do you serve? “You will either hate the one and love the other, or you will be devoted to one and despise the other.” Do you love God like Hetty Green loved her money?